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Post Info TOPIC: Sikorsky-Boeing S-100 / SB>1 "Defiant" (FVL/JMR)


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Date: June 10th
Sikorsky-Boeing S-100 / SB>1 "Defiant" (FVL/JMR)
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Thought that we had a topic for it already, but I guess not, so here it is finally.

The SB-1 (or SB>1 as it's sometimes stylized) is a joint entry to the FVL program and Joint Multi Role Technology Demonstrator (JMR-TD) program by Sikorsky and Boeing, with phase one based on past efforts with the X-2 and S-97 designs. Its first test-flight was in March 21, 2019, at Sikorsky's Development Flight Test Center in West Palm Beach, Florida, followed by a demo flight on February 20 of this year. More on these events in the links below:

https://www.military.com/dodbuzz/2019/03/22/sikorsky-boeings-futuristic-defiant-rotorcraft-completes-first-flight.html

https://www.military.com/daily-news/2020/02/20/sikorsky-boeings-sb-1-defiant-helicopter-prototype-impresses-leaders-flight-demo.html

It is also supposed to receive an upgraded engine replacing the T55 to meet the FVL/JMR range requirement, this new engine of which being a development of the Future Affordable Turbine Engine (FATE) program, more on that here.

In addition to this development, both the Defiant and Raider have resulted in an offshoot design that Sikorsky is offering for the Army's Future Reconnaissance Aircraft (FARA) program, called the "Raider X."

Video of the Defiant demonstrator in flight:

https://player.vimeo.com/video/391703183

Plus some more of the February demo:



-- Edited by Stingray on Wednesday 10th of June 2020 02:05:11 AM

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(Just a heads up, some of these news articles I'll be posting are old, but they will provide context that will aid any potential discussion here).

https://www.military.com/daily-news/2020/02/22/test-pilots-sound-futuristic-helicopter-vying-replace-armys-black-hawk.html

 

Test Pilots Sound Off on Futuristic Helicopter Vying to Replace Army's Black Hawk

22 Feb 2020

Military.com | By Matthew Cox

WEST PALM BEACH, Florida -- Test pilots who fly the SB-1 Defiant claim that the futuristic helicopter could get its tail shot off in combat and still fly faster than an undamaged UH-60 Black Hawk.

The Sikorsky-Boeing Defiant just performed a high-profile flight demonstration for Army leaders. And a version of dual-rotor aircraft is competing to one day replace the venerable Black Hawk as the service's new Future Long Range Assault Aircraft (FLRAA) under the Future Vertical Lift (FVL) effort.

Defiant strikes an intimidating silhouette with its prominent X2 technology, which features a coaxial rotor system and a large rear propeller that replaces the tail rotor found on conventional helicopters.

Sikorsky-Boeing officials said the new aircraft design will be capable of flying at speeds of more than 200 knots, or 230 miles per hour, and maneuvering like a fine-tuned sports car.

Test pilots on Defiant said they love the rear pusher-prop, which is designed to provide revolutionary thrust, but are also comforted that it can take direct hits in combat without causing catastrophic failure to the aircraft.

"It's all self-contained back here; you can take significant combat damage back here, and if you lose the prop, you are still a 150-knot machine," Ed Henderscheid, former U.S. Army AH-64 Apache pilot and Boeing's lead test pilot for Defiant, told defense reporters recently.

Unlike a conventional tail rotor, the rear pusher prop is completely electric, he said.

"Not having hydraulics in the tail boom as a helicopter pilot is a huge deal," Henderscheid said. "I have had hydraulics failures where they were caused by a break in the hydraulic line ... and it's scary when you have to go to keep your tail rotor where you want it. Not having to worry about a leak ... or some mechanical failure -- that's a really, really comforting thought."

The Army awarded a team from Sikorsky, part of Lockheed Martin Corp., and Boeing Co. a 2014 contract to build Defiant as part of the Joint Multi-Role Technology Demonstrator (JMRT-D) program.

A Textron Inc.-Bell team also received a contract under the effort and built the V-280 Valor, a tiltrotor-design helicopter that completed its first test flight in December 2017.

The Defiant faces stiff competition from the Valor, which flew at 200 knots at a test flight in January, according to Defense News.

So far, the Defiant has flown up to 140 knots, but test pilots say the speed is based on technology that has already been proven in the Sikorsky S-97, the first helicopter of this type built with the X2 coaxial rotor and rear-thrust propeller technology.

The Raider has been flying since 2018 and has surpassed speeds of 200 knots, Sikorsky representatives said. It is currently being scaled into the Raider X, which will be 20% larger and designed to compete in the Army's Future Attack Reconnaissance Aircraft (FARA) effort, which is also part of the Future Vertical Lift program.

During Thursday's test demo, Defiant flew at about 140 knots, but only used about 20% of the pusher propeller capability and about 30% of the engine power on Defiant, Henderscheid said.

"You translate that power into the prop and you go faster," he said. "The requirement that we needed to design around is 230 knots, and we will easily hit that."

The pusher prop can also be reversed very quickly to provide negative thrust for quick braking power, and then turned off for a quieter sound signature, said Bill Fell, a former Army aviator and senior experimental test pilot for Raider and Defiant.

"Coming into that objective, I'm using all of the thrust from the prop. And when I am close enough where I want to lower acoustic signature because I don't want to let them know I am coming, I can disengage it and fly in at helicopter like speeds," Fell said.

Tim Malia, director of Sikorsky's FARA effort, said the X2 technology will mean a greater survivability rate for combat aviators.

"You are now getting in faster and you are getting out faster, so you have reduced the amount of time you are in a dangerous environment," Malia said.

This wasn't lost on former Army Black Hawk pilot Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Illinois, who attended the Defiant flight demo.

The former Army National Guard officer lost both of her legs after she was shot down by enemy fire in Iraq in 2004.

"The ability to slow down within a very short distance -- within a half mile -- to be able to go from 200 to zero -- that's amazing," Duckworth said. "I think about the fact that when I was flying ... I was slow, I was exposing my belly to everyone, to anyone who wanted to shoot at me.

"I got shot down flying 10 feet above the trees going 100 knots."

In addition to speed, Defiant's X2 technology features a rigid rotor system that provides significantly more agility and maneuverability for an aircraft than what conventional aircraft have today, Malia said.

"The conventional rotor system has a lot more give, think about it like the ride of Cadillac -- it's less responsive," Malia said. "When you get to a rigid rotor system, it's more like you are talking about a Porsche or a Ferrari in the level of responsiveness."

Fell said the rigid-rotor system feels "more like a fighter jet response than a helicopter response -- it's that crisp."

The Sikorsky-Boeing team and team from Textron-Bell have both provided Army program officials with test data throughout the JMRT-D effort, which ended last fall.

The Army is scheduled to begin a competitive demonstration and risk-reduction phase for FLRAA. That phase is set to finish in 2022, the year the service plans to down-select to one vendor to build the Black Hawk replacement.

"What these tech demonstrators are providing is great data back to the Army to understand what the future rotorcraft capability could be," Jay Macklin, director of Future Vertical Lift Business Development for Sikorsky.

"The Army is going to take all the information that is learned through the JMRT-D program, and it is going to come up with what it feels is the best design to move forward in the FLRAA competition."



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"SB>1 DEFIANT™ Moves Forward for Future Vertical Lift":

https://www.lockheedmartin.com/en-us/news/features/2020/sb1-defiant-moves-forward-for-future-vertical-lift-fvl.html



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"Speed, Maneuverability, Survivability and Sustainability are the Hallmarks of Sikorsky’s X2 Technology":

https://breakingdefense.com/2020/06/speed-maneuverability-survivability-and-sustainability-are-the-hallmarks-of-sikorskys-x2-technology/amp/

Breaking Defense: Speed is at the essence of the Army’s Future Vertical Lift helicopters. Please describe how the X2 technology helps you meet the Army’s high-speed requirements for the Future Attack Reconnaissance Aircraft (FARA) for armed reconnaissance missions, as well as the Future Long-Range Assault Aircraft (FLRAA) transport program to carry light forces and equipment farther and faster than the Black Hawk helicopters it is scheduled to replace.

Macklin: Speed is clearly part of the overall Army focus with Future Vertical Lift. And, yes, from the outset, X2 Technology included a focus on speed, showing how we can double the speed of traditional single main rotor helicopters that are in service today. We’ve proven that with the original technology demonstrator, with RAIDER and with DEFIANT. It is important to note that our mission isn’t just to get to the X (mission area) faster though… we must execute the full mission within a high threat environment and have the MDO survivability features to return home too. Future Vertical Lift is a holistic solution to a rapidly evolving near peer threat. Speed provides ability to base further away and still get to the fight when needed, speed coupled with increased maneuverability makes us more survivable on the battlefield, and speed gets our warfighters home quicker. Critical to harnessing the speed is the ability to operate at very high speeds at very low altitudes maintaining a high degree of control while evading enemy radars. We must hide the aircraft within the environment, taking advantage of manmade and natural obscuration. So enabling speed in that environment means having onboard algorithms and software that flies the aircraft at speed at treetop level which requires providing assistance to the pilot to allow him or her to focus on the mission and not the machine. We call this supervised autonomy; Enabling the aircraft to operate at its full capability while allowing the crew to focus on mission execution.

Supporting the speed is a comprehensive mission system, designed in parallel with the aircraft, which includes communications gear, sensors, data fusion and internal weapons storage volumes to execute the mission and provide the reach, lethality and survivability critical to the mission. Our Modular Open System Architecture will allow that mission system to morph over time to remain ahead of our threats. The mission system also must be interoperable with other assets on the battlefield, Army assets, other service assets and international ally’s assets. All these things must work in concert with one another to achieve our customer’s mission success. What we offer is a highly integrated weapon system with decades of growth potential. We are aren’t offering an end-of-road capability. We see our RAIDER X for FARA as an investment for the future that is well under the Army’s price targets.

Breaking Defense: What role does X2 technology play in survivability?

Macklin: Survivability is so important to every single mission we fly. It makes no sense to send an aircraft, crew and passengers into harm’s way unless we know that we have given them the ability to achieve the objective and get home safely. Survivability is a complex chain with many links. Many of these link to the onboard mission system and the connectivity to offboard sources. X2 Technology plays a role in several of the links. X2 helps us avoid detection by flying faster and lower than other aircraft configurations. The maneuverability of the aircraft with X2 is so much better than single main rotor helicopters as X2 handles very responsively, much like a sports car hugging corners on a racetrack, X2 and our flight control system hugs terrain at speeds previously unimagined. X2 has the ability to operate at a reduced acoustic signature to avoid detection from human threats with shoulder launched rockets or delaying detection so long that automated systems cannot be brought online fast enough to achieve a lock on our aircraft. X2 coupled with onboard flight controls provide an opportunity to break lock with a targeting system through intelligent signature management and rapid maneuverability. X2 can perform a brake turn away from a threat in a fraction of the distance that a single main rotor (SMR) helicopter can, drastically reducing our exposure time and escape the threat faster. These are critical elements of survivability that a SMR simply cannot accomplish. Avoiding detection from radar, avoiding human detection and being able to break target locks when necessary are all assisted by X2 and our comprehensive survivability software and hardware suite all working together. That is one of the many values that Lockheed Martin provides to the Army, we provide this level of integration on a number of DoD platforms across all services and bring the experience of a world leader in advanced military technology in MDO environments.



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https://www.verticalmag.com/news/sikorsky-boeing-defiant-zooms-past-200-knots-in-forward-flight/

 



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Sikorsky-Boeing S-100 / SB>1
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That's impressive,,, Defiant it is.

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