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SR-71 Black bird
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Info (wiki): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_SR-71_Blackbird



-- Edited by Leela25 on Wednesday 1st of April 2020 05:02:24 PM

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Thanks for the info.



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A-12 Blackbird

http://www.sr-71.org/blackbird/a-12/

The A-12 is the forerunner of the SR-71 and has nearly the same shape and dimensions as its replacement. Designed to replace the U-2, the A-12 flew higher and four times as fast to outrun enemy defenses and gather intelligence. The A-12 is primarily an over flight vehicle unlike the SR-71. Its major advantages in capabilities to the SR-71 include its higher-resolution photography and its ability to go marginally faster (Mach 3.3) than the SR-71. However, the SR-71 was chosen as successor to the A-12 due to its side-looking radar and cameras, allowing it to gather important reconnaissance data without penetrating enemy airspace.

YF-12 Blackbird

http://www.sr-71.org/blackbird/yf-12/

The YF-12A is a concept aircraft for a mach 3+ bomber/interceptor that provided a strong deterrent against world aggressors. In order to protect North America, 93 production F-12Bs needed to be built. However, the program was cancelled in the mid-1960s for budgetary reasons. Also, the Strategic Air Command (SAC) may have felt that the YF-12 would threaten the development of their other supersonic bomber, the XB-70 Valkyrie.

SR-71 Blackbird

http://www.sr-71.org/blackbird/sr-71/

Unofficially, the SR-71 carried many nicknames, including the "Habu," "SR," "Lady in Black," and "Sled;" but most of us know the SR-71 as the "Blackbird." The SR-71 was developed as a long-range strategic reconnaissance aircraft capable of flying at speeds over Mach 3.2 and at 85,000 feet. The first SR-71 to enter service was delivered in 1966 and due to politics, it was retired in 1990. However, the USAF still kept a few SR-71s in operation up until 1998, after a few were brought back to service in 1995. NASA's DFRC at Edwards AFB, CA flew the SR-71 from 1991 until its final flight in October 1999.

M-21 Blackbird

http://www.sr-71.org/blackbird/m-21.php

The M-21 is one of the few projects at the Skunk Works that was relatively unsuccessful. The M-21 is an A-12-like aircraft designed to launch the once ultra-secret D-21 Drone. When the United States signed a treaty to end flights of manned vehicles over the Soviet Union, an unmanned vehicle was needed for reconnaissance. Since the A-12 is an overflight vehicle, it would undermine the treaty if used in the future. Consequently, after A-12 #60-6939 was built, two aircraft called M-21s were built for the TAGBOARD program.

There were two M-21 aircraft built, 60-6940 and 60-6941. Aircraft #60-6941 crashed when the aircraft collided with a D-21 during the launch. This crash ended all M-21 sorties. Later on, the B-52H was used to launch the D-21 drone. The other M-21 is on Display at the Museum of Flight in Seattle, WA.

D-21 Drone

http://www.sr-71.org/blackbird/d-21.php

Due to the agreement between the Soviet Union and the United States restricting the use of manned vehicles over the Soviet landmass, this unmanned aircraft was developed. The drone was carried and launched by two A-12-like aircrafts called M-21s, and a number of B-52Hs.

The D-21 was released at high speed, and was separated from the M-21 by the use of ballistic charges. The concept behind the drone was quite simple. It would fly over a landmass and eject the reconnaissance data before crashing, to be recovered shortly after by the Air Force. This aircraft was never used operationally, and only 38 of these drones were built.



-- Edited by Air_Gopher on Sunday 17th of April 2011 07:32:25 PM

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SR-71 Flight Manual

http://www.sr-71.org/blackbird/manual/

SR-71-6CF-1 Functional Check Flight Procedures Manual for SR-71A and SR-71B aircraft

http://www.sr-71.org/blackbird/sr-71-6cf-1/

YF-12A-1: The YF-12A Utility Flight Manual

http://www.sr-71.org/blackbird/yf-12a-1/



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Thanks Air Gopher!!



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All that was from the Blackbird Archive, good site.http://www.sr-71.org/blackbird/



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From DefenceTalk




-- Edited by Leela25 on Thursday 2nd of April 2020 12:40:29 PM

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http://www.flightglobal.com/PDFArchive/View/1993/1993%20-%202255.html?search=Grumman%20ATF%20aircraft

An attempt by design students to research a multi-role supersonic advancedtactical fighter-bomber (ATFB) development of the Blackbird.



-- Edited by Commander31 on Sunday 17th of April 2011 07:48:52 PM

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Northrop 1993 Advanced Fighter-Bomber Concept



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Commander31 wrote:

Northrop 1993 Advanced Fighter-Bomber Concept


And a read further at SPF and you'll find a magic linky to an informative PDF...

http://pdf.aiaa.org/preview/1993/PV1993_4010.pdf



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if they decided to go through with the bomber concept, it would have to be able to defend itself, becauase no other aircraft back then besides another SR-71had the range to stay with it on its missions



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Here are a couple of tidbits.

A strike version of the Blackbird was looked at, design designation B-12. It looked like and SR-71 with an F-12 type nose. Among the payloads were four AGM-69 SRAM missiles in the chines. Launched from B-52s, the SRAM had a range of up to ~100 miles, depending on the profile used. Launched from the much higher speed an altitude of a Blackbird, it was estimated they'd have a range of 500 miles. Lockheed didn't push to hard for tis version because of a promise made to USAF that they wouldn't try and compete with the B-70, which USAF thought there might be a chance of reviving.

The F-12B was not canceled for budgetary reasons. Congress funded a program initially for 93 aircraft, with potential growth to over twice as many. Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, though, wanted USAF to use his F-111 as a basis for a new interceptor, and impounded the money. When USAF showed no interest and Congress funded the program again the following year, he attempted to force the issue by ordering the production line for the Blackbird destroyed, insuring no F-12s (or any other version) could ever be built. This was not a contractual obligation, except in the sense that any contractor is required to do what ever DoD says with a production line it paid for).

Regarding the interception of SR-71s by JA-37s, it must be remembered that on those missions the SRs were required to fly through a very predictable, narrow corridor to remain out of anyone's national airspace, Teh SR would make no defensive maneuvers, which would not be the case on a "hot" mission. Nor were the full capabilities of the SR's DEF (defensive electronics) package used. There'd be no point, since everyone knew where the ac was (even if you couldn't catch it, from the Viggen's altitude you could see it by looking waaay up). In addition, turning the DEF fully on to block the Swedes could turn out to be an ELINT intelligence bonanza for the Soviets.

Although two were kept in flyable storage for a year after President Clinton killed the program, no SR-7 flew for the Air Force from the moment the Presidential line item veto (the only time it's been used in history, BTW) hit in 1997.


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First flight of the A-12 at Groom Lake narrated by its pilot, Lockheed test pilot Lou Schalk



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NATF wrote:

A strike version of the Blackbird was looked at, design designation B-12. It looked like and SR-71 with an F-12 type nose. Among the payloads were four AGM-69 SRAM missiles in the chines. Launched from B-52s, the SRAM had a range of up to ~100 miles, depending on the profile used. Launched from the much higher speed an altitude of a Blackbird, it was estimated they'd have a range of 500 miles. Lockheed didn't push to hard for tis version because of a promise made to USAF that they wouldn't try and compete with the B-70, which USAF thought there might be a chance of reviving. 


 The strike version was the RS-12 (RS = reconaissance strike). Bomber versions designated B-12/B-71/RB-12 (RB = reconnaissance bomber, variant of the A-12) were also proposed but were shelved in favour of the RS-12...  these were what conflicted with the B-70 not the strike version. the RS-12 was supposed to cary a successor to the AIM-47 with a variant of the Polaris A-3 warhead, inside an internal weapon bay plus the GAM-87 Skybolt's navigation system. The goal was that in the event of nuclear war the aircraft could penetrate enemy airspace at mach 3.2 at about 24 km altitude to scan for targets and subsequently strike with all weather radar-guided missiles within a 6 to 15 m CEP at about 81 km range.

It got as far as a mockup of the frontal section around 1962. It wasnt funded for further development due to politics at the time revolving around the viability of delivering nuclear weapons via bomber platforms post cancellation of the B-70.



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I think the B-71 was a later proposal than those? There were a bunch of bomber proposals and some didn't carry designations. The subject for which missiles were going to be used is sort of confusing. I have read that the AGM-69 was selected but the AIM-47 is mentioned too. Interesting to note that some layouts proposed that the missiles were going to be carried on a 4-store rotary launcher in the bay like on the B-52.



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Some design features had carryover or had a more linear evolution. I included the designation among those since it drew its roots from the B-12, i wasnt thinking about the confusion that it would cause sorry xD

I've read that too about the SRAM armament but there is more reference to the modified Hughes GAR-9/AIM-47.... it was being tested on the YF-12A and B-58 during the programme. The radar and fire control systems were specially modded too.



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