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Hughes helicopters
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I start this thread with the Hughes Model 2000, from FlugRevue, 1981.



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The Hughes 205 was a 1951 project for a large double-deck passenger helicopter. Huge main rotor and tiny tail rotor make it look a bit funny...

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Stéphane



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Hi,

here is two Hughes projects developed from XV-9 and
anther early hot-cycle project.




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hesham


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Thanks hesham! I'd never seen these before.

Here is the unbuilt XH-28 flying crane, a development of the XH-17. Both the latter and the former's full-scale mock-up can be seen together in the first photograph.


-- Edited by Stargazer2006 on Tuesday 2nd of November 2010 12:25:14 AM


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VHLH very-heavy-lift helicopter, might be related to the XH-28.

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No, the VHLH was a much later program.

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Stéphane



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Early concept of the Hughes XH-17.

From Flight International, 1949.


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Some info on the XH-28 from McDonnell Douglas Aircraft since 1920: Volume IIby Rene J. Francillon, 1997:

Development of a large helicopter was begun in January 1951 to meet an Army requirement for a flying crane capable of transporting combat-loaded military vehicles weighting up to 20 tons (18.1 tonnes). Like the XH-17 which was then about to be flown, the XH-28 was to use a pressure-jet system to drive the four-bladed main rotor, with two Allison XT40-A-8 turbines being geared to a compressor unit and compressed air dueled to burners at the tip of each blade.

Weighing 23587kg empty and 47627kg loaded, the XH-28 was to have had enclosed accommodation for two pilots. Its four tall undercarriage units, each with dual-wheels would have given it a spider look while providing adequate clearance for outsize loads. These loads were to have been either slung beneath the fuselage or carried on a flat-bed attached between the undercarriage legs and fitted with a ramp for loading and unloading vehicles.

The design was subjected to extensive wind-tunnel tests with various suspended loads, and a full-scale mock-up was constructed. In spite of its promising capability, the XH-28 was not built due to cutbacks in the research and development budget made near the end of the Korean War.

 



-- Edited by -airfoil- on Tuesday 2nd of November 2010 11:29:35 PM



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Just a little fun fact, the XH-28 was given a full-height "walk-in" access door on the hot-cycle rotor hub. You can see it open in the last photo in Stargazer's post.



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A superb (and I believe quite unusual) picture of a YHO-2-HU (Hughes 269), the ancestor of the whole Hughes 300 lineage.

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Stéphane



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Great find! And here is a 3-view.

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Stingray wrote:

And here is a 3-view.


 

That's the Model 300... :P



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I think "Model 300" was just a commercial designation for the Model 269, just like the "Model 500" was the commercial designation of the Model 369.

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Stargazer2006 wrote:

I think "Model 300" was just a commercial designation for the Model 269, just like the "Model 500" was the commercial designation of the Model 369.



Sort of. Model 300 is the designatio for the production series and 269 the prototype.



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I'm afraid you are wrong on this one...

A market survey carried out in 1955 by the Hughes Tool Company, an American company active in many areas of the aeronautical industry, showed that the time was ripe for a low-cost lightweight two-seat helicopter. The Aircraft division began building the Model 269 in September 1955. This helicopter had a fully-glazed ****pit with side-by-side accommodation for two, an open-framework fuselage and a three-blade articulated rotor. The prototype flew in October 1956, but it was not until 1960 that Hughes decided to develop this machine further by producing an improved version, the Model 269A, to which many aerodynamic and structural refinements had been made. The aircraft also proved ideal for police work and other duties. About 20 a month were being produced by mid 1963 and by spring 1964, 314 had been built.
The Hughes 269A was more interesting than the earlier prototype from a structural point of view. It had a redesigned, more compact ****pit and a steel tube fuselage. The landing skids were curved upwards at the front, and two small wheels could be added to facilitate ground handling. There was a small, asymmetrical butterfly tail unit. The project was submitted to the US Army who ordered five, designated YHO-2-HU, for evaluation at Fort Rucker, and a number of recommendations by Army engineers were adopted by Hughes to improve the design and establish production. In summer 1964, the Army chose it as a primary trainer and ordered 20, designated TH-55A Osage. Two subsequent orders brought the total number of the Osage in 1965 to 396. In 1967, another order was received, bringing the total to 792. Deliveries ended in March 1969.
The various two-three seat versions of the 269 (later redesignated Model 300) were very successful abroad, notably the agricultural version, but they were also sold to air forces and operators in Algeria, Brazil, Colombia, Ghana, Haiti, India, Kenya, Nicaragua, Sierra Leone, Spain and Sweden. The final variant, the 300C which had a more powerful engine and a new main rotor, could carry 45 per cent more payload than the first models.
The Hughes 300 has been built under license by Kawasaki in Japan and by Breda-Nardi in Italy. In both countries, the parts were initially imported from the United States with full-scale production following later. In 1983 the US production rights were sold to the Schweizer Aircraft Company in New York.
G.Apostolo "The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Helicopters", 1984



But there is also more to the story than I thought, as you can see in this detailed account of all versions:

More than 3,000 of these piston-engined light helicopters have been produced, first by Hughes and then by Schweizer, in the following versions.

Model 269: Two two-seat prototypes (N78P and N79P) were built in 1956. The three-bladed main rotor and the two-bladed tail rotor were driven by a 180hp Lycoming O-360-A horizontally-opposed four-cylinder air-cooled engine which was mounted below the side-by-side seats. The first flight was made at Culver City on 2 October 1956.

Model 269A: To serve as prototype for this production version, Hughes modified the second Model 269 by replacing its truss tail boom with a one-piece aluminium tubular boom and introducing several minor modifications to improve handling and ease manufacture and maintenance. After five helicopters were built as YHO-2s for evaluation by the Army, the Model 269A was put into production during the summer of 1960. Customers could request the installation of dual controls and select the low-compression O-360-C2D (for use with 80/87 octane fuel), high-compression HO-360-B1B (for use with 91/96 octane fuel), or fuel-injected HIO-360-B1A versions of the Lycoming flat-four engine, all rated at 180hp for take-off. 95 litres of aviation gasoline were carried in a tank mounted externally aft of the ****pit and, if required, a 72-litre auxiliary tank could be added on the opposite side. Including the prototype and three pre-production aircraft, but excluding five YHO-2s and 792 TH-55As built for the US Army, Hughes produced 307 Model 269As.

YHO-2: Bearing the serials 58-1324 to 58-1328, five YHO-2s were evaluated by the US Army in the airborne command post and observation roles in 1957-58. However, as there were enough Bell HO-13s and Hiller H-23s in its inventory and funds were lacking, the Army was unable to have the HO-2 put into production.

TH-55A: This military version of the Model 269A, which was selected by the US Army in 1964 to become its standard training helicopter, retained the Lycoming HIO-360-B1A installation of the civil version but was fitted with military radio and instrumentation. An initial contract for 20 TH-55As was placed in 1964 and subsequent contracts under the Fiscal Year 1964 to 1967 budgets brought total Osage procurement to 792 (serials 64-18001/64-18020, 64-18025/64-18239, 65-18240/65-18263, 66-18264/66-18355, 67-15371/67-15445, 67-16686/ 67-17002, and 67-18356/67-18404). One TH-55A (67-16924) was experimentally fitted with an Allison 250-C18 turboshaft engine derated to 200shp while another was fitted with a 185hp Wankel RC 2-60 rotating-piston engine.

TH-55J: This designation identified 38 Model 269As which were assembled in Japan by Kawasaki Jukogyo KK for delivery to the Nihon Rikujyo Jieitai (Japanese Ground Self-Defence Force) and given the Japanese military serials 61301 to 61338.

Model 200 (or 269A-1): Offered in both Utility and Deluxe versions ? the latter featuring more attractive exterior styling, upgraded interior furnishing, electrical and longitudinal cyclic trim, and other refinements ? this version was developed under the 269A-1 designation, certificated in August 1963, and marketed as the Model 200. Forty-one Model 200s were produced for civil operators and foreign military customers. They incorporated various improvements dictated by operational experience but were essentially similar to Model 269As. Model 200s were powered by 180hp Lycoming HIO-360-B1A or HIO-360-B1B engines and had a main fuel tank with a capacity of 95 or 114 litres.

Model 280U: This was a utility version of the Model 300 incorporating an electric clutch and an electric trim system. Normally delivered in a stripped-down single-seat configuration, the Model 280U could be fitted with agricultural spraying equipment.

Model 300 (or 269B): Through a careful re-arrangement of the cabin, relocation of instruments and controls, and substitution of a contoured bench for the individual seats of earlier versions, Hughes was able to develop a three-seat variant without changing the exterior dimensions of its light helicopter. Initially designated Model 269B, the three-seater received its FAA Type Approval in December 1963 and was produced at the rate of one helicopter every working day beginning in 1964. Power was supplied by the 190hp Lycoming HIO-360-A1A engine. The Model 300 was the first version which could be fitted with floats made of polyurethane coated nylon fabric in place of the standard skids on oleo-pneumatic shock-absorbers. A total of 463 Model 300s, 280Us, and 300 AGs was built by Hughes.

Model 300AG: This variant of the Model 300 was tailored for agricultural spraying with two 114-litre chemical tanks one on each side of the fuselage above the skids, and a 10.67m spray boom.

Model 300B: To reduce exterior noise level to that of a light aeroplane, Hughes developed a quiet tail rotor. This QTR was installed during production beginning with helicopters delivered in June 1967 and was offered as a retrofit kit for early production Model 269s and 300s. The Model 300B designation was given in some company documents to QTR-equipped three-seat helicopters.

Model 300C (or 269C): Powered by a 190hp Lycoming HIO-360-D1A engine driving a three-bladed rotor of increased diameter (8.18m versus 7.71m), the Model 269C was first flown on 6 March, 1969, received its FAA Type Approval on May 1970, and was put into production at Culver City. Production of the Model 300C was temporarily suspended during the summer of 1981 due to a decrease in demand but resumed in March 1982. However, after the manufacture of three prototypes and 1,162 production Model 300Cs and 300CQs, Hughes transferred the production of its light helicopter to Schweizer Aircraft of Elmira, New York, in November 1983. The first Schweizer-built Model 300Cs came off the new assembly line in June 1984 and Schweizer continued manufacturing Model 300Cs under licence even though McDonnell Douglas had acquired Hughes Helicopters in January 1984. Finally, in November 1986 Schweizer purchased all rights to the 269 and 300 series from MDHC. By the autumn of 1989, Schweizer had produced 250 Model 300Cs and TH-300Cs (the latter being a training version for foreign military customers) and demand for both models appeared to be stronger than at any time since the early 'seventies.
In 1969, Nardi Costruzioni Aeronautiche Spa in San Benedetto del Trento, Italy, had acquired limited licence rights from Hughes Helicopters to manufacture the Model 300 and subsequently these rights, extended to include the Model 300C, were transferred to BredaNardi. During the 'seventies and 'eighties, the Italian firm went on to build Model 300s and 300Cs for civil customers and for the Greek Army.

Model 300 Sky Knight: This version, which was developed and built by Hughes as the 300QC and is still built by Schweizer, was specially intended for urban police patrol activities. It differed from the Model 300C only in being fitted with sound deadening materials and a muffler to reduce emission of audible sound by 75%.

Model 330: First flown on 14 June, 1988, the Schweizer 330 is a development of the 300C with the piston engine replaced by an Allison 250-C20W turboshaft derated to 200shp. The cabin length and width have been increased respectively by 0.61m and 0.43m to provide accommodation for a pilot and three passengers (two sitting on a bench slightly aft and between the two front seats) in the utility configuration or for an instructor and one or two students (with flight controls at all three positions) in the training configuration. Moreover, the ****pit enclosure has been streamlined, modern instrumentation has been provided, the aft fuselage has been faired, and a stabilizer with end plates added ahead of the tail rotor. Schweizer has actively marketed the Model 330 to commercial customers, law enforcement agencies, and foreign civil and military operators, and in early 1990 was proposing it to the US Army for use at Fort Rucker as part of the Initial Entry Rotary Wing Integrated Training System. Thus, this turboshaft-powered version may well become the successor of its piston-engined TH-55 forebear. Moreover, in June 1989, Schweizer became a minority partner (35%) in Jordan Aerospace, a company which may undertake assembly and manufacture of Model 330s in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan.


-- Edited by Stargazer2006 on Wednesday 22nd of December 2010 12:56:11 AM

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Excellent research work, Stéphane!



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The YAH-63 taken by Raulboy at Deviant Art

http://www.deviantart.com/download/206915530/yah_63_bell_model_409_2_by_raulboy-d3f6x1m.jpg

yah_63_bell_model_409_2_by_raulboy-d3f6x1m.jpg



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Please note that this helicopter is a YAH-63, Bell's unlucky competitor to the Hughes YAH-64.

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Stargazer2006 wrote:

A superb (and I believe quite unusual) picture of a YHO-2-HU (Hughes 269), the ancestor of the whole Hughes 300 lineage.


 

From Mark Nankivil, the YHO-2-HU for the LOH competition, later to be used as a trainer called the TH-55 Osage.



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Commander31 wrote:

Early concept of the Hughes XH-17.

From Flight International, 1949.

 

The XH-17



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Hughes VHLH (Very-Heavy-Lift Helicopter) layouts:

http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/864891.pdf



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What about this one OH-6 in Piasecki style. Sorry no description available only model picture.

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Here is another I think it is from Popular Mechanix article.
I think it is a Hughes "in house" design proposal, with it's early streamlined rotor hub. This could be a "fast killer egg".

-- Edited by Hell(i)Master on Saturday 4th of February 2012 09:34:32 PM

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I wonder, could that be a Nagler proposal? It shares some similarity with the VolJet concept here:

http://stingraysrotorforum.activeboard.com/t37530618/nagler-helicopters-and-projects/



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I'm positive I've seen this one before... but where??

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Hell(i)Master wrote:

Here is another I think it is from Popular Mechanix article.
I think it is a Hughes "in house" design proposal, with it's early streamlined rotor hub. This could be a "fast killer egg".

-- Edited by Hell(i)Master on Saturday 4th of February 2012 09:34:32 PM


 Not sure which bird you are talking about, but the main helo in the picture is a Kaman SH-2 with wings that was tested by the US Army.  I would definitely love to see a Loach with a ringtail though.

Ray

You guys have to have a few OH-6A pics in the Hughes thread.

These are of the YOH-6A from teh original LOH competition.

YOH-6%2520overhead-3%2520small.jpg

 

With XM8 40 mm

Gen%2520Von%2520Kann%2520Col%2520Rankin%2520Col%2520Hornby%2520Hunter-Liggett%2520June%25204%25201964-4%2520small.jpg

 

Here are a few TH-55 pics as well:

 

611.jpg

 

TH-550037%2520small.jpg

 

These two bird were used by the US Army Aviation Test Board:

TH-550040%2520small.jpg

 

TH-550041%2520small.jpg

 

Finally a civil 300:

TH-550077%2520small.jpg

 



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1959 model of the proposed YHO-2HU:



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The YHO-2HU (Hughes 269) was not just "proposed", it was actually built and flown! Originally ordered under the designation XH-42, it was first flown in October 1956 and produced in five examples, and became the basis for the TH-55 Osage.



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Pictures of the YHO-2HU:



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Stargazer2006 wrote:

No, the VHLH was a much later program.


 

May be this was the Model-1000 !.



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